G.I. Joe comics from IDW Publishing are at a crossroads

I’ve been going back and forth on this for a long time now, but after the events of the last twenty-four hours, I think it’s time that I make a decision.

GeneralsJoes will no longer be covering or providing coverage of IDW Publishing’s G.I. Joe comics until something can be done about writer Aubrey Sitterson.

From a personal perspective, I can respect his devotion to his political beliefs.  Hell, to be totally honest, I share some of those beliefs.  But over the past several months, Mr. Sitterson has systematically worked through social media to generate a sense of ill-will for the majority of the G.I. Joe fan base, and I’ve reached a point where I just don’t want to discuss it or give it any exposure any more.

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It started in the G.I. Joe: Discussion Facebook group where some members were talking about a particular G.I. Joe cover, which caused Mr. Sitterson to get exceptionally hostile towards the fans to the point where he posted an image of himself giving the middle finger with a blatant image of the president blowing his own brains out on a t-shirt.

Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m no fan of Donald Trump (an issue I will NOT be discussing further so don’t bother asking) but the gesture struck me as being completely out of line for a creator who is attempting to engage with the fan base.  As if that wasn’t bad enough, when one of the admins stepped in, Mr. Sitterson fell back to his personal social media platform and proceeded to accuse the entire group of being homophobes and racists, a complete and total misrepresentation of the facts.  He has used this same tactic with a recent exchange regarding folks expressing sympathy and emotion for the events of September 11th.

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Since then he has continuously posted virulent and aggressive posts through social media while at the same time promoting G.I. Joe, and over the past several weeks I have grown increasingly uncomfortable with how closely linked the G.I. Joe brand has become with his own mode of online commentary.  Mr. Sitterson has spent a lot of time in the wrestling world, and he certainly seems to be working to generate heat, hoping that this heat will spill over into sales and attention for the G.I. Joe comics.  Unfortunately, sales continue to falter and I see disgusted fans by the dozens unsubscribing or expressing their distaste for the way the current writer is handling himself.

G.I. Joe, at this moment, strikes me as a brand in crisis.  I strongly believe any curator of that brand in a professional capacity needs to express himself in a professional manner.  Mr. Sitterson has not been doing that for a very, very long time, and eventually his agenda is going to drive away what few hardcore fans the G.I. Joe brand has left.

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Believe me, I am about as far from the “hardcore G.I. Joe military RULEZ” crowd as you can get.  I have plenty of room in my love for the brand to accept the more eccentric and outlandish stories.  That’s a huge part of what has made G.I. Joe what it is today.  In another life I would enjoy and appreciate the outlandish nature of what Sitterson is trying to accomplish, but his aggressive belligerence makes it impossible to do so.

What I cannot do is accept the fact that one of the brand’s creative members seems to feel a need to work so hard to ostracize the fans who have supported this brand for decades.  His recent tweet about September 11th was poorly worded and borderline offensive, and when folks have called him on it, his response was (and I quote):

“But as a guy who stood in the streets of lower Manhattan, where he lived, and watched it all unfold: F*ck you.”

Is that really the brand ambassador that we all want at the head of the ship?  Also, did he forget that the events of 9/11 not only impacted New York, but Washington, DC, Pennsylvania and thousands of people who lost family members aboard the aircraft that crashed into the two towers?

From a personal perspective I will no longer be buying IDW Publishing’s main G.I. Joe title.  I’ve been purchasing every single G.I. Joe comic since 1984.  It took until 2017 to get me to stop, but I have finally been worn down to the point of just not being able to support it anymore.

Mr. Sitterson has complete and total freedom of speech and as I’ve already said, I fully respect his opinion and his intense desire to share that opinion regardless of what others may think.  It’s an admirable trait.

However, in this case, I think he is actively damaging a brand that cannot withstand the continued punishment, and the best interests of IDW Publishing’s G.I. Joe universe do not necessarily align with his.  For that reason, I’m expressing my own freedom in not promoting or commercially supporting IDW Publishing’s endeavors with the G.I. Joe universe.  It’s unfortunate, and honestly I’m sure my little voice in this big, huge world doesn’t mean much, but I’ve gotta do what I feel is right.

IDW Publishing’s Reinvention of Visionaries – Love or Hate, nothing in between

Part of the whole HasCon weekend experience was a first look at IDW Publishing’s new Visionaries comic (well, technically Transformers vs. Visionaries comic) and the first glimpse at the design aesthetics for these more modern Visionaries.

So far, as one would expect, the reactions have been visceral, with a lot of hate being piled upon them.  Myself?  Honestly?  I love them.

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I won’t lie, I’ve been more than a little discouraged by IDW’s recent track record with G.I. Joe comics (aside from Hama and Gallant’s stellar continued work on ARAH) and as much as I’ve tried to get into and excited for Revolution, Revolutionaries and First Strike, I can’t quite get as pumped up as I want to be.

However, this first look at the Visionaries?  I’m loving it.  Over at Visionaries.Net, they’ve really  dissected the reveals and taken a deep dive into this first peek into this side of the Hasbro universe and have done a spectacular job at it, too.  If you have even a passing interest in Visionaries, you need to hit TheVisionaries.net and see the cool stuff they’re doing.

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Check out some of the mirrored images below, courtesy of IDW, but a bunch more are also over at TheVisionaries.net.  Some good stuff.

First in hand look at SDCC Revolutions Boxed Set – Guest Review

Good morning and happy ComicCon everyone!

No doubt, from a G.I. Joe perspective one of the most exciting things we learned about ComicCon this year was that Hasbro would be releasing a spectacular Revolutions Boxed Set featuring G.I. Joe scaled figures of several different characters throughout their properties, including MASK, Visionaries, Transformers, Rom, and Micronauts.

Well, good friend of GeneralsJoes and noted author James Kavanaugh, Jr. managed to get his handsome mitts on one of these Revolutions sets early and has been kind enough to put together an early review and look at the set!

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You can find the review right here and eventually I’ll pop it up in one of the menus above, as soon as I can figure out where it belongs.

Humongous thanks to James for taking time out of his busy life to grab some pictures and do a fantastic write up of this great set.  As an added bonus, here are some images of the COBRA Missile Command Center he sent along as well, featuring better looks at the COBRA’s within and filecards!

GeneralsJoes Guest Review – ComicCon Revolutions Boxed Set

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Hi, all!  James “KuuKuuSon” Kavanaugh Jr. jumping in and I think this is my first review, at least first for GeneralsJoes.com.  Justin, is that correct?  Eh, he’s probably off hob-knobbing with all the other big shot toy reviewers.

Well, here I am, off to the good stuff (the review if you’ve listened to too much What’s on Joe Mind? and thought other ideas).  I was fortunate enough to get my hands on the Hasbro/IDW San Diego Comic Con 2017 Revolution crossover set and, let me tell you, this. set. is. AMAZING!  If you’re out of the loop or kept your heads in your vintage Marvel Joe comics, IDW has merged their existing G.I. Joe and Transformers universes together and brought in the new classics Action Man, ROM, Micronauts ,and MASK (Mobile Armored Strike Kommand) to take action and adventure to new levels.  Children are notorious for mixing their various toy lines in their play (admit it, at least tried it) and this premise really helps to bring back that feeling.

At this point, I’ll clarify by saying I self-identify as G.I. Joe guy through ‘n through, though I own a copy of almost every Transformers comic and have picked up every IDW copy of every title listed above in the Revolution universe.  I’ve always felt review readers should know where the reviewer is coming from as well as where I’ll be going in regards to my preferred brands and explain why my perspective may not nail other brands.  I will say, seeing each brand come together certainly made me excited for everyone.  I was born in 1977 in the United States to round out my perspective.

So is this a review of the set or biography?  Why not both? (que the Old El Paso taco girl).  I am laying the foundation of “me” because the undertone of this set will seem like the overtone by the end of the review and that undertone is nostalgia.  At least half of this set hasn’t had much of a presence since the 80’s and it’s quite the welcome feeling. Of course I remember Joe and Transformers, I also loved watching MASK every day and the holograms on the Visionaries toyline were hypnotic.  My age tells you I was a bit too young for Micronauts but caught up when they made a resurgence in the early 2000s.  ROM was a new one to me but those I trust to have a well-rounded and educated understanding of comics were stoked to see his return.  Apparently, in a pop culture sense, the comic surpassed the toy in many ways and developed a devout cult following.  The final reason why I felt it was important to give a background on “me” is every 4” action figure in this set derives from 2007+ G.I. Joe tooling, which is almost like they designed the set to dangle in front of me.  Eh, they would’ve had me anyway. 

The set is $100 and I find that more than fair.  I put current 4” action figures at $10 a piece MSRP and there are six of them so divide the $40 between a mid-sized Transformer and nine Micronaut figurines.  You’re hard pressed to convince me that alone isn’t a win.  What those figures consist of makes this set worth waaaaaay more than $100 as we’ll discuss in the review.

Transformers

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I thought I’d start with, from my perspective, the easy one and that’s Jetfire.  I had the original Jetfire as a child so I’m biased towards him.  This one, however, is way more dynamic.  He is currently in more of the forefront (of a flashback) in IDW’s current story but a great character to speak for his brand.  When this set was announced, I was made aware that this mold has some fan demand to it, so I’m glad they’re able to have another chance to obtain him.  He’s a pretty straight forward Transformer.  The modern designs are structural masterpieces and almost puzzle–like.  My age also reminded me of the old adage, “if you don’t use it, you’ll lose it” and that refers to my transforming skillz.  It took me a minute but I chalk that up to quality design.  I have every bit of confidence I could’ve tossed it to a kid and they would’ve transformed him as fast as a Rubix Cube champs works his cube.  The paint apps are solid, the plastic is durable, and the quality is fine.  I’ll take this time to clarify that, when it comes to action figures like this and we know this is a rare figure rerelease, I am more than confident there are better reviews of the toy out there and I would be doing the toy a disservice by expanding beyond the pictures.

Micronauts

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I’ll get the “bad” out of the way for you and clarify/state the obvious that all nine Micronauts are unmovable figurines.  However, I’m not going to say that’s a bad thing.  Micronauts are what their name implies (you’re going to have to educate yourself if you don’t know what I’m getting at) and they are just that.  I think the figurines are the perfect size for everyone to play with as is and within the crossover experience.  Plus they’re nine of them.  Reading the Micronauts comics, I find the designs to arguably be the most dynamic and perfect fusion of vintage foundation with innovative redesigns.   And that is a huge compliment from me as someone who thinks tweaking nostalgia can be a very slippery slope for vendor and customer.  I liked and agreed when I read the comment online about a potential figure/game combo coming from these figures.  They could certainly work as table top pieces.  The plastic is decent, slightly bendy, yet able to stand with little falling (something I’ve noticed to be a problem with cheaper figurines).  And to wrap this portion of the review up as a bad/good/bad clarification sandwich, I can take a step back see this set as a whole and dub the approach as using “strategic tooling” to hit a specific price point.  The review will round out this comment but, for now, I’m confident nine Micronauts fit in with six 4” figures and a decent Transformer guides the Micronauts into a figurine format and that’s fine the moment you have them in hand.  Micronauts forged the 1:18th scale action figure phenomenon, so I’m confident we’ll see larger and movable Micronauts in the near future.

MASK

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Onto the first of the six 4” action figures and I thought, once again, I’d start with an easy one.  Matt Trakker is easy for a “Joe guy” because we received Matt Trakker in 2008 and he was deemed a member of G.I. Joe.  The 2008 Matt Trakker suggests that the crossover universe was on Hasbro’s mind as far back as them and only helped us out now.  This version reuses previously seen G.I. Joe body tooling and accessories and, the parts choice more accurately reflects the stylized approach IDW is taking.  The reds are richer and the greys are darker.  This figure seems to really punch.  Side note, I understand the output of the 2008 version, he is a product of the tooling available at the time whereas the Revolution Matt Trakker had the advantage of a much larger tooling catalog.  Neither is better than the other.  Speaking of difference, yes, there is one very noticeable difference, the IDW version is no longer a blonde, white male but a black male.  I need to make a point to confirm this but I am confident the change derives from a certain team we all know already had a blonde, white leader.  Seemingly unrelated, early super hero costumes’ simple and bright tropes derive from easy recognition on the reader’s part.  I’m sure Duke will be interacting with Matt Trakker in the storyline and these minor tweaks will help move the story along for the audience.  This assumption doesn’t wash over the point that diversity has been actively addressed in all facets of modern society and sited as an important component of the shared universe going forward.  I think it’s safe to assume we will be seeing more gender and ethnicity changes in the future if we haven’t already.  Outside of that, the head sculpt is simply stunning!  This very charming head sculpt will certainly be appealing for expert customizers and LBC’s alike.  Yes, I can admit an action figure is handsome.

Action Man

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Another handsome chap in plastic form is Action Man.  If you’re unaware, Action Man was a direct cousin to the G.I. Joe 12” line and has been seeing a resurgence across the pond.  I seem to recall Action Man specifically hitting US shelves at a certain point but I’ve always been a 4” fanatic (except for MOTU, that’s another story).  Action Man in the Revolution set looks like he’s peeled right off the comic pages.  The body is familiar tooling but the blue with orange striping really makes Action Man pop.  Orange has been made a staple of Action Man’s color palette and the combination makes him look ready for action. I think you have to say action as much as possible whenever you’re having a conversation about Action Man.  His accessories are also familiar and the plastic and paint quality is the same for all the 4’ figures.  I am a bit of a stickler for paints and this entire set checks all my boxes (a big plus in my book).  The win for this figure is of course the head sculpt.  Another dashing head that has a slight comic/cartoon tinge, but a head sculpt works with the paint scheme.  His hair is tussled, his smirk is brazen, he’s a young James Bond ready to do the impossible mission and we wouldn’t have it any other way.

ROM

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Like I said, when IDW first announced the shared universe, ROM was a new concept to me.  Also, like I said, if my cadre of “experts” says it’s a go, I’ll give it a shot.  And (while I’m adding conditions) since the comic overshadowed the toy, ROM moved away from a blocky robot and gained a blocky/humanoid hybrid esthetic.  The designer accurately chose Battle Armor Cobra Commander’s legs to set the ground work and gave him muscular arms to bridge the gap.  FYI, ROM is a humanoid encased in the robotic armor and sworn to fight the Dire Wraiths, having an element of humanity in the character is important.  The chest and head sculpt (as well as his iconic blaster) are all new.  Plus he’s shiny.  Kid James liked shiny.  I’m going to leave for a bit and stare at the shiny.  Just kidding (or am I?  You’ll never know when this was stopped and resumed).  These parts are great and very accurately reflect the ROM seen in the comic books.

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The Dire Wraith also captures the pages of the ROM comic.  Dire Wraiths are aliens that kill humans and assume their form, typically assuming roles of those in powerful positions.  So, the underlying tone of the comic is you never know who is a Dire Wraith until they reveal their true form.  This figure in particular represents the point in the story when Doc is revealed to be a Dire Wraith.  Oh, did I spoil it for you?  Well, the bad news is you were spoiled the moment you looked at the figure because the satchel and body motif tells you exactly who it is…er, was… The arms are from the infamous Zombie Viper and do a great job to bridge the comic character to action figure form given the grand scheme of the set(see my budget comment in the Micronauts write-up).  The arms are great, the paint apps help punch up the tentacles and the darker approach to Doc’s uniform helps punch the Dire Wraith blue while darkening the overall tone of the villain.  The money on this piece is again the head sculpt.  This head wonderfully portrays the Cheshire grin that is the staple of a Dire Wraith.  They are an arrogant villain set on dominating Earth and ROM is intent on wiping that smile of their evil faces.

Visionaries

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This figure should’ve been last but, if you’ve read everything so far (my apologies), you’ve probably figured out my progression.  Why did I just waste your time there?  Because Visionaries are not yet in the IDW universe, nor do they have an active comic nor any press release announcing any plans.  Leoric certainly took us by surprise.  And, if you like Visionaries, he looks great!  Again, I leave the parts knowledge to the gang at joecustoms.com and other experts but, as far as I can tell, looks great.  The overall military (with a tinge of ninja) motif in G.I. Joe doesn’t leave much for sword and sorcery tooling, but the legs look great.  Besides, Visionaries had a bit of a modern take to them anyway.  Much like ROM, the big pay day is the chest, head, and helmet.  The head is fantastic and the helmet and body totally nailed his vintage look.  Did I say pay day?  Because this figure is money.  If the new parts weren’t enough, the staff is new and, along with his chest, have holograms in them!  I’ll be honest, that was my immediate concern when I first saw the press release and it is indeed a lot more holographic than the pictures assume.  They aren’t as holographic as the original (or how holograph stickers tend to look) but I have a feeling that it falls under my budget/price point commentary undertone in this review.  The blues are striking and accurately reflect the vintage toy and give it the 80s feel.

G.I. Joe

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So that’s all the new concept, some of which haven’t been seen since the 80s.  Everyone discussed above is enough to put this set on the “must have” list.   So why did I save the G.I. Joe last?  Biased, of course.  Yes and no.  This Joe isn’t just any Joe, it’s Roadblock.  Oh, huh… No, not huh, this isn’t just any Roadblock, this is the cancelled Renegades Roadblock head, chest, and overall build.  So, backstory, Renegades was a G.I. Joe cartoon in 2011 that, for reasons that are too long to write in an already long review, left Roadblock stuck in the “unreleased” queue.  The only member of the main G.I. Joe Renegades cast to be unreleased.  And, it’s argued that the cartoon Roadblock had the most personality out of the entire main cast.  This figure also had a second failing in 2012 when a Retaliation movie four pack was cancelled, a pack he was a member of.  Word that the figure was waiting in the wings has left collectors waiting in the wings for a future release and, after six years, the time has finally arrived!!  I need to ask around, but I am confident this is also his intended Renegades deco pattern.  It’s not exactly in sync with the comic palette but who cares!?  Long awaited Renegades Roadblock trumps crossover Roadblock any day.  This figure is so great, I am confident a more comic accurate version will sell just as well.  But back to the figure at hand, if the pictures don’t paint the picture, this Roadblock fits with the Renegades figures seamlessly!  I can’t say enough great things about this figure.  The weapons assortment appears to be the Pursuit of Cobra’s “Jungle” Duke but, again, who cares?  It was probably the set from his internal SKU number and there are plenty of “Ma Dueces” out there in weapons bins to load him up as you see fit.  The body is one we’ve seen a few times by now but it great to see it in its originally intended form.  Finally receiving this figure is as significant as finally receiving the characters above.  Big “KuuKuu” points (non refundable and I wouldn’t suggest you eat them) to Hasbro for providing us with this one.

So, if you’re still awake and reading, here we are.  Like I’ve eluded throughout the review, the set sells itself.  I hope these pictures satisfy those who can’t wait to see and obtain this set.  I’ll confess that mild mannered James is a bit helpless without his heavily artillery used for the Rank & File guides and I’m going to milk this “first review evah” crutch as long as I can.  If you picked up on my whimsical approach to this revue, it’s because this set did indeed make me feel like a kid again.  Archiving is probably the most “adult” think one can do with his toys (no, I’m not trying to convince myself I’m doing anything actually adult with my toys, though I probably should) and not very fun in the moment (first world toy guide problems).  It’s more of a delayed gratification.  From start to finish, this set was all about fun.  It was great to see these characters receive action figure form once again and the only way to accurately review them was to have fun with them. And, like I said, I am a G.I. Joe guy (mostly dictated by my wallet fyi) so getting a chance to transform a Transformer and pit my various toys against each other was a great thrill.  The Ohio weather isn’t polite to talk about, but being outside with my toys play working will be a highlight for this summer. I will be curious to see the overall reception of this set as well as what the results will bring in the future.  Joe Con told us something is changing for Joe and something can only change for every other property in this set beyond G.I. Joe.  But don’t wait for the future, live in the moment with this set and get it however you can.  This set jazzed me enough before I even received it to start the page layout for an upcoming guide.  Yeah, it’s not much but I thought this could at least double as an insight into where I start and where I’ll finish.  I am currently hashing out where these crossover action figures in the grand scheme of archiving but, again, I can’t stress enough that this set allows you to put all the “where does this belong in my ‘Joeverse’” malarkey and have fun.  Fun and action.  And action fun.

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Excellent upcoming cover images for Real American Hero by John Royle

If you’re not following along with John Royle on Instagram (or at JohnRoyleArt.com) you’re missing out.  He’s been posting some spectacular images from upcoming covers for G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero by IDW and he has been KILLING it.

The upcoming gatefold COBRA themed cover looks exceptionally awesome, and any time Spirit graces a cover it’s a good thing, too.  Check out some of the snippets below and keep watching his Instagram for the latest updates.  Good stuff.

The Marissa Faireborn mystery has been revealed…

First and foremost, a HUGE thanks to Josh over at YoJoe who has been doing spectacular work with their comic archive, tying the IDW Universe together, even as G.I. Joe has been criss-crossing continuity with other Hasbro properties.  He’s managed to make it easy to follow and make sense, and with the latest reveal of Marissa Fairborne, he goes above and beyond!  He’s written a terrific guest post for GeneralsJoes.com which you can read below.  Again, big props to his loyal and devoted following to the ongoing IDW continuity and how this all ties back to history.  Some really great stuff!

Big News in the GI Joe and Transformers world has just happened in the IDW comic Optimus Prime #3!

An event literally 30 years in making has finally been confirmed (In continuity).

Summaries of all of the different series can be read at YoJoe.com, so you can follow the stories.

Yes, its official, Marissa Faireborn of The Transformers Earth Defense Command is the daughter of GI Joe’s Flint.  And they actually sit down together in a coffee shop and talk.

For 20 years it was only rumored that Marissa was related to Dashiell and the mother was a mystery.  Outside of a DVD commentary, no cartoon, comic or other media has ever confirmed their relationship.

Now for the first time ever and within the IDW continuity, the Joe and Transformers worlds have been combined allowing a long time meeting between Flint and Marissa to happen.

Both GI Joe (not ARAH which is written by Larry Hama) and the Transformers along with Action Man, MASK, ROM and Micronauts are all included in the IDW continuity.  The mini-series Revolution recently tied all of the Hasbro properties together into one universe.

But one mystery that has never been solved officially in any cannon is who is Marissa Faireborn’s mother?

Let’s dive into some Transformers and GI Joe history that got us to this huge reveal.

First, in 1985 Series Four of GI Joe A Real American Hero toys, a character named Flint aka Dashiell Faireborn was released.  He actually premiered in GI Joe: the Revenge of Cobra cartoon episode #1 “In Cobra’s Pit” on Sept 10th 1984, he is voiced by actor Bill Ratner.  Flint has been a leader of the Joe since his first arrival in toys, comics or cartoons.  And in both the comics and cartoons his love interest is fellow GI Joe Lady Jaye aka Alison Hart-Burnett, who also was released in Series Four.  Flint’s in continuity cartoon stories took place in the 1980s.

On September 16th, 1986 a new character named Marissa arrived in the second episode of the third season of the cartoon The Transformers.  The title of the episode was called the “Five Faces of Darkness, Part 2”.  Marissa Faireborn was part of the Earth Defense Command (EDC) that was helping and fighting the Transformers on Earth.  In the timeline of the Transformers series continuity, Captain Faireborn was living in 2005.

At the time of Marissa’s premiere on the cartoon, GI Joe and Transformers had no official connection between the toy lines.  This was the first hint of many crossovers to come in the 30 year history of Hasbro toys and the Faireborn family.

In The Transformers cartoon episode called “The Killing Jar” with had an airdate of Sept 29th, 1986.  Disguised as a shuttle, the Transformers Quintesson ship docks with an EDC space station, and Marissa Faireborn is lured on board by an illusion of her father.  Although not officially called Flint, this character is voiced by the same actor Bill Ratner who performed Flint in the regular GI Joe cartoon.  “Flint’s” appearance in this episode has him with grey hair in his 60s, still active with the military and in good if not distant relations with Marissa, at least well enough for the projection to fool her.

Happening in another part of the Hasbro universe, released in January 1987 in Marvel comics, was a completely different kind of crossover between GI Joe and the Autobots.  Writer Michael Higgins wrote an official in the ARAH continuity 4 issue mini-series called GI Joe and The Transformers.  Now this mini-series does not contain nor reference Flint, Marissa or even the Earth Defense Command.  But forever became official A Real American Hero cannon, whether the fans liked it or not.

Over in the United Kingdom, on August 8th, 1987 issue #125 of Marvel’s UK The Transformers is released with an original crossover story called Ancient Relics Part One. The rest of this story also appears in the Marvel UK Action Force comic #24 titled Ancient Relics Part Two, #25 is Part Three, #26 Part Four, #27 is Part Five.  Flint is the leader of Action Force in the UK, when in the London underground a Transformer is discovered and it’s Megatron. Autobots Wheeljack, Grimlock and Blades all fight with Flint and his Action Force team against Megatron.  Additionally, the Ancient Relics storyline was reprinted in 5 parts in the UK’s Action Force Monthly (Issues #1-6) in 1988 which in America is called European Missions (Issues #1-6) as in 1988.  It has always been debatable whether European Mission is officially part of the ARAH continuity.  But either way it is still an original story that crosses over Flint with The Transformers, presumably before Marissa was even born.

6 years later in 1993, The Transformers appear within the GI Joe A Real American Hero comic starting with issue #139 until #142.  Now this is officially within the ARAH continuity.  Megatron shows up and partners with Cobra Commander and of course the Joes fight them.  At the conclusion of #142, Marvel’s The Transformers Generation 2 becomes a spin off comic book series starting with #1.  The GI Joe’s only appear in 3 issues of the series and Flint appears in Transformers Generation 2 #6.

Since GI Joe and Transformers first official crossed over they have since crossed over in comics numerous times with several different publishers since 1993.  Generally, each of these is their own continuity and the publisher’s were Devil’s Due Publishing, Dreamwave and IDW.   The Dreamwave Transformers GI Joe series has the Joes fighting in World War II against The Transformers.  This series introduces Nathaniel Faireborn who is Flint’s father and Marissa’s grandfather. In the Devil’s Due crossover series Flint actually goes to Cybertron.  In Dreamwave’s G1 Transformers series Marissa now holding the rank of Commander, rather than Captain, portrayed as a member of the EDC, which in the Dreamwave continuity clandestinely handles terrestrial/extraterrestrial encounters. Following the Transformers’ return to activity on Earth early 21st century, The Transformers plans were stopped, but Marissa’s superior officer did not share her fondness for the Transformers. Dreamwave’s bankruptcy and subsequent closure left remaining stories of Marissa Faireborn untold.

Marissa was a key character in US the Transformers cartoon series but never appeared in a Marvel comic in the 1980s.  In the 1990s in a comic in Japanese, Manga style, that was never released in America and connected to a radio series, this is called KISS Players.  Marissa as a child in the 1990s, lived in New York, where she met and became friends with Shaoshao Li, who developed an extremely strong attachment to her. The young Marissa resented her military father, so when one of his missions went awry and she and her father had to be rescued by Optimus Prime, she quickly came to view the Autobot leader as a surrogate father figure… and perhaps a little bit more.

Ok, so that covers comics and cartoon references between Flint and the Joes and Marissa and the Transformers.  In recent years the toys have started to crossover Joes and Transformers and the Transformers and GI Joe Collector’s Club in 2015 released a Marissa Faireborn toy, see the GeneralsJoes toy review.

But who is Marissa’s mother.

Fans speculated for two decades that the character Marissa Faireborn in Transformers is his daughter, since they both share the same last name. The writers of both shows remained coy whether Marissa Faireborn was actually Flint and Lady Jaye’s daughter or not. However, cast notes for “The Killing Jar” refer to Marissa’s father as being “a 60-year-old Flint”. The mystery was finally solved on November 7, 2006, with the 20th anniversary DVD release of The Transformers: The Movie. On an interview on the DVD, Flint Dille, story editor for Transformers, confirmed that Marissa Faireborn is indeed Flint and Lady Jaye’s daughter.  This would subsequently make Marissa a distant relative of Destro as well. However, in an interview with G. I. Joe fansite Joe Headquarters, Dille added the caveat that “I’ve always thought of Flint as being too young to have a daughter that old.”

And now you know and knowing is half the battle.  But we don’t know who Marissa’s mother is within the IDW continuity.  Stay tuned.

References: Yojoe.com, tfwiki.net, Wikipedia.com

Exclusive debut – John Royle Gatefold cover from G.I. Joe: RAH 237, 238, and 239

Wow, nothing brightens up a Friday afternoon like some spectacular new art from IDW cover artist John Royle!  He’s been doing some really terrific variant covers for G.I. Joe titles recently, and this latest one is the mother lode.

It’s a three-issue gatefold with pencils by John Royle, inks by Jagdish and colors by Juan Fernandez.  It frankly looks… amazing!  Check it out for the very first time right here, and if you love these covers, definitely let IDW Publishing know.  I think they’re some really fun, energetic and well orchestrated covers, and I try and go out of my way to get these issues.  Great stuff.  To see more of John’s terrific artwork (G.I. Joe and otherwise) you can follow him on Instagram or hit up JohnRoyleArt.com!

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Special Retail Incentive Cover for IDW’s Revolutionaries #4 by John Royle

In recent months, comic artist John Royle has put together some amazing G.I. Joe covers, and just revealed was his retailer incentive cover for Revolutionaries #4 from IDW Publishing.

This cover looks just as exciting as the other work he’s been doing, which is really saying something!  Check out this fantastic cover and the comic details below.  Fantastic stuff from John Royle.

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Revolutionaries #4
Art by John Royle
Inks by Eeshwar
Colors by Juan Fernandez

Check out more of John’s great work at JohnRoyleArt.com!

GeneralsJoes Reviews the G.I. Joe: Revolution One Shot

We are officially neck deep inside IDW Publishing’s Revolution roller coaster, and just today, the G.I. Joe: Revolution One Shot hits comic shops!  It’s a Revolution story focused on the G.I. Joe side of the house, continuing IDW’s existing universe, but weaving it into this over-arcing Revolution story.

So how did it work?  Click the Read More link for the full review!

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YoJoe.com’s guide to Revolution is essential reading

It seems with every new comic day there are new issues tying into IDW Publishing’s Revolution storyline.  Even I’ve had a hard time keeping it all straight.

Thankfully, over on YoJoe.com, their comic aficianado antarctica is diving headlong into the Revolution story and has posted several updates in the YoJoe comic section.

You can see a number of links in this Revolution One-Shots forum post, which will direct you to all sorts of other pages with full information and summaries on all the one-shot comics released to date.  There’s also a general Revolution forum post as well, which links to a number of different comic book recaps for all of the associated Revolution stories.

It’s a great resource for anyone who wants to dive into Revolution and keep up to date with all of the associated titles.  Huge thanks to antarctica and YoJoe.com for providing this great resource!

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